Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
tom-hutchinson

Tom Hutchinson

Chief Analyst, Cabot Dividend Investor, Cabot Income Advisor and Cabot Retirement Club

Tom Hutchinson is the Chief Analyst of Cabot Dividend Investor, Cabot Income Advisor and Cabot Retirement Club. He is a Wall Street veteran with extensive experience in multiple areas of investing and finance.

His range of experience includes specialized work in mortgage banking, commodity trading and in a financial advisory capacity for several of the nation’s largest investment banks.

For more than a decade Tom created and actively managed investment portfolios for private investors, corporate clients, pension plans and 401(K)s. He has a long track record of successfully building wealth and providing a high income while maintaining and growing principal.

As a financial writer, Tom’s byline has appeared in the Motley Fool, StreetAuthority, NewsMax, and more. He has written newsletters and articles for several of the nation’s largest online publications, conducted seminars and appeared on several national financial TV programs.

For the past seven years, Tom has authored a highly successful dividend and income portfolio with a stellar track record of success. At Cabot, Tom provides monthly Cabot Dividend Investor issues, regular weekly updates on every portfolio position and a weekly podcast discussing goings-on in the market.

From this author
This market just continues to forge ever higher. The S&P 500 closed at new all-time highs four times last week. The index is now up 15% YTD, and we’re not even at the halfway point.
A good ‘til canceled (GTC) order can help you set the stage for dip-buying opportunities when they inevitably present themselves in the next down market.
The market has been terrific. And it will probably finish the year higher than it is now. But there is reason for caution.

Because of sticky inflation, interest rates remain near the highest levels in 20 years and may continue to stay high or go higher, until they drive the economy down. A hugely contentious presidential election is about to take place. And there are two significant global wars going on.

Steep selloffs are common even in markets that rise over time. The S&P 500 doubled over the last five years. But it crashed 30% in record time at the onset of the pandemic in 2020. There was also a bear market in 2022 during which the S&P fell over 20% and the Nasdaq plunged well over 30%. Of course, most stocks were down a lot more than the indexes. If you targeted some of the very best stocks at fire sale prices you could have gotten amazing returns.

In this issue, I highlight a way to target the purchase of the very best stocks at fire sale prices amid market turmoil that may occur from the potentially market-roiling issues this year or next. Most investors don’t buy when the market is crashing because it’s natural not to want to try and catch a falling knife. But there’s a way to take emotion out of the equation and calmly plot a way to fantastic returns.
It’s been a great market for a while. But it has leveled off since the middle of May. I expect more of the same going forward.

The S&P 500 pulled back in early April after a five-month rally as sticky inflation soured the interest rate narrative. The index then recovered to new highs in the middle of May on an improved interest rate outlook. But stocks have since leveled off as the interest rate outlook got stuck in the mud.
The market has been good for a while. The S&P 500 is up roughly 11% YTD and about 30% since late October. But I expect choppier waters ahead.

The main driver of the S&P has been the technology sector, which is being driven higher by the artificial intelligence catalyst. Most of the rest of the market seems to be at the mercy of the interest rate narrative. And that seems to change every couple of weeks nowadays.
It’s a great time for income. The market is at an all-time high. The May through November period is historically a more lackluster period for stocks. Income generation is an ideal way to generate positive returns when stocks aren’t rising. But not if the stocks generating the income get knocked down by rising rates.

There is a great answer: midstream energy stocks. These are companies that transport and store oil and gas for a fee. The subsector is among the highest yielding of all income-generating stocks. And unlike many dividend stocks, they have thrived over the last few years of rising interest rates. For the most part, these stocks are not interest rate sensitive and can endure inflation or recession. They have proven to be the perfect sector to generate a high income in this market environment.

In this issue I highlight a stock that has been the very best income generator in the Cabot Income Advisor portfolio. It has been held profitably in the portfolio on three past occasions. Each time it delivered a positive total return along with several covered calls for huge income. It’s a tested and true income-generating superstar.

People will always need electricity, gas and water. And that’s what makes utility stocks so reliable. Here are three that I like right now.
The market has regained its footing, and here comes Nvidia (NVDA).


All eyes are on the Nvidia earnings report scheduled to come out after the closing bell on Wednesday. It was an Nvidia earnings report two years ago that featured a massive demand for artificial intelligence products and services that sparked the AI craze and ignited a powerful rally in technology stocks.
Forget interest rates, inflation, and market noise. There’s a demographic megatrend driving health expenditures higher and powering the best healthcare stocks. And it’s likely to continue for years.
It’s been a good month in the market, so far. The S&P 500 has regained all the dip from April and is now within a whisker of the all-time high. The driving forces have been an improving interest rate story and solid earnings.

With 92% of S&P 500 companies having reported, earnings increased an average of 5.4% over last year’s quarter. But it’s better than that. If you take out the report of Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY), average earnings growth would be 8.3% for all the other stocks on the index. That’s a strong gain.
The market has rallied for more than a year in the happy space between inflation and recession. But that dynamic is unlikely to persist. Amid persistent inflation, it is likely that the market will have to contend with high interest rates or a faltering economy. Each one is problematic.

In a flatter or faltering market, dividends provide a bigger part of total returns. Let’s get ahead of the curve and get a big fat yield.

In this issue, I highlight a stock with a massive dividend yield that has shown good price stability for several years. The company can also thrive amidst inflation and high or rising interest rates and can provide a high income return even if the market struggles through an inflation/recession catch-22.
Buying this Dividend Aristocrats ETF is a way to own the 65 best dividend growth stocks on the market. But there are other alternatives too.
What had been a tug-o-war between the souring interest rate narrative and earnings excitement is showing signs of veering in yet another direction.

The news on both inflation and the economy has been worse. The Fed’s favorite inflation gauge, the Personal Consumption Expenditures Index (PCE), came in higher than expected at 3.7% last week. Inflation continues to creep higher this year. And that’s with interest rates already at the highest level in decades.
Just when things were getting seriously ugly, the market started having a great week.

Interest rate disappointment is being replaced by earnings anticipation. The new earnings season came in the nick of time. After five straight up months, the S&P was having a terrible April. Last week was the worst week of the year so far and the index has fallen over 5% from the recent high.
The rally sputtered. And it’s all about interest rates.

Investors had been factoring in falling interest rates and a soft landing. But now, investors are increasingly expecting no landing and continued high rates. Recent strong economic numbers, along with higher-than-expected inflation, are changing the perception.

It looks like these high rates will stick around for a while. And most stocks don’t like high rates. But not all. There are some companies that actually thrive with higher interest rates. And that creates opportunity. In this issue, I highlight a stock that pays a massive dividend generated by these high interest rates. As income investors, we can reap the bounty.
After five consecutive up months for the market, April has been a bummer. Is this just an overdue end to the recent rally or something worse?

The S&P 500 is down 3.6% so far in April. But the more interest rate-sensitive sectors have faired far worse. Sure, the rally was long in the tooth anyway. But the narrative has also changed for the worse.
While the financial news obsesses over what the Fed might have vaguely implied in the latest statement, the world is morphing into a different place. The demographic of humanity is rapidly transforming in a way that will massively affect the flow of money for the rest of our lives. The world is currently undergoing a technological revolution that is transforming society and everyday life.

The aging population and the technological revolution are megatrends that will dominate the investment landscape for years to come regardless of what the Fed does, or GDP in the next few quarters, or whoever gets elected president. It’s not an accident that the best performing stocks in the Cabot Dividend Investor portfolio are in healthcare and technology. Nor will it be an accident that these same stocks continue to dominate from this point forward.

In this issue, I highlight the massive opportunity to position yourself in front of a tsunami that could provide the best investments of your lifetime.
Any income investor should know how to reinvest dividends. Whether you should depends on what you’re looking for as an income investor.
What are qualified dividends? It’s important to know what makes a dividend qualified for tax purposes. Here’s what you need to know.
If you want to spread out your dividend payments, an ex-dividend date calendar is a handy way to keep track of all your payments.
It was a great first quarter. The S&P closed out March up 10% YTD. The index also rallied an impressive 28% from late October through the first quarter. Is there more upside ahead?

Things have been good. The Fed reiterated its intention to lower the Fed Funds rate three times this year at the March meeting. Meanwhile, inflation is way down and the economy is solid. Manufacturing data was much better than expected and the Fed raised its GDP forecast for 2024 from 1.4% to 2.4%.
A bullet was dodged, and the bull market forges on.

It looks like the Fed is going to play ball. There was much worry among investors that the Fed would abandon the three-rate-hike goal for this year amid higher-than-expected inflation. But they didn’t. The Fed reiterated its intention for three cuts this year. The odds of a first cut in June increased to 70%.
After last week’s market turmoil and Fed/economy-related focus, it’s time to add some all-weather stocks to your portfolio. Here are two.
The title sounds counterintuitive. After all, the market has been terrific. And technology stocks, which rarely pay dividends, are leading the charge.

The S&P 500 has spent much of this year making new all-time highs. The index has rallied 27% since late October and 46% from the low in October of 2022. But most of those gains have been driven by the technology sector, which represents an outsized portion of the S&P. Returns for the rest of the market have been rather lame.
AT&T (T) and Verizon (VZ) are perhaps the two most widely recognized telecom stocks. But which is the better stock today?
It’s time for all investors to obsess about the Fed again. The Central Bank has its March meeting this week and Wall Street is on pins and needles waiting to hear what they might vaguely insinuate.
The rich get richer. Now, you can too.

Growing businesses with big ambitions need large amounts of money to grow and expand to the next level. But these enterprises can’t get the necessary capital from stodgy and risk-averse bankers. And they are still too small to access the capital markets by issuing stock or bonds. Thus, they are forced into the domain of wealthy individuals and institutions that have money and are itching to reap high returns.

These venture capitalists provide desperately needed money to up-and-coming businesses that can’t get it anywhere else. Thus, they are in a position to negotiate very favorable terms for themselves.

As financial markets have grown in sophistication, venture capital investing is no longer the exclusive domain of the wealthy. There is a little-known class of security that enables regular investors to mimic the very same moneymaking strategies employed by the rich and famous. These securities are called Business Development Companies (BDCs).

In this issue, I highlight one of the most successful BDCs on the market. It pays dividends every single month, has a long and consistent track of raising payouts, and has delivered fantastic total returns.
The market rally is forging ahead and making fools of the doubters, despite the Tuesday pullback. The S&P 500 is up 20% since late October and 7.5% so far this year as of Monday’s close.
All is well with the market so far this year. The S&P is up 6.7% in less than two months. It’s a continuation of the 23% rally that started at the end of October and a more than 40% rise from the bear market low in late 2022.

But recent news may jeopardize the current market dynamic. January CPI was higher than expected and indicated that the current problematic inflation isn’t dead yet. Sure, it’s way down from the 9.1% peak in mid-2022 to 3.1%, but it has been rising for several months and is still well above the Fed’s 2% target.
The Goldilocks scenario of falling inflation and a still-strong economy is unlikely to last. Interest rates will have to come down before long or the recession that the market is dismissing might be just a little further down the road. But recent higher-than-expected inflation is making lower rates less likely.

Sure, the rally could last for a while. The economy always seems to be more resilient than people expect. But the circumstances behind the rally since October are unlikely to last. This environment will change. For that reason, it doesn’t make sense to chase stocks that have been working so far this year. It’s better to position ahead of a new dynamic that is likely coming.

Change creates opportunity. There are many great income stocks that are not benefiting from this rally. Yet these stocks are selling at historically very cheap valuations with high yields. These stocks also can thrive in a slowing economy. In this issue, I highlight two stocks in particular that are cheap and high-yielding ahead of a period of likely market outperformance.